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Monday, September 29, 2014

Student Shares Interviewing Lessons

Interviewing for a job or an internship can be unfamiliar to students. I’m certainly not an expert on interviewing, but I’d like to share some thoughts on previous experiences that may help you with a future interview.

Currently engaged in my second internship, I’ve learned some valuable lessons in regards to handling an interview.

My recent internship’s interview process was fairly traditional. Aware that a job opening existed on campus with Career Development, I sought further details. Everything happened quickly, and I found myself scrambling to compose a legitimate resume and cover letter. I now recognize that it’s key to have these things prepared ahead of time, since you never know when an opportunity may arise. Looking back, this process would have been less stressful if I would have had these documents organized.

Aside from a professional appearance, personality and demeanor are critical. Confidence is crucial during an interview. It’s important to relax, but also to be open and enthusiastic.  Now is the time to break out of your shell a bit. Don’t be afraid to elaborate on your statements during an interview. This assists the employer in seeing a truer you, and in gaining a more-detailed answer. Make sure to back up any positive claim about yourself. Always provide further information.

Don’t be afraid to ask questions. Questions can often show your intelligence and your interest in the company and position. Prepare yourself by researching your employer prior to meeting. 

After the interview, always send a thank you email. Make sure to follow up with the employer and be prompt with returning messages.

 
 
By Timothy Weaver, Career Development Intern


Thursday, September 11, 2014

Gwynedd Intern to Share Video and Photo Talents


My name is Timothy J. Weaver and I’m a senior majoring in Communication at Gwynedd Mercy University (GMercyU). I’m currently taking on my second internship with Career Development at GMercyU. I recently completed an internship with Delaware Valley Outdoors; a long-running television series that aired on PBS.

While with this organization, I was given the opportunity to work with the producer. I furthered my experience with shooting and editing videos, as well as capturing and editing photos. I learned about video and photo production as a whole, as well as social media management and promotion.

I decided to gain additional professional experience by connecting with Career Development after completing this internship.

Internship

As the new Communications and Marketing intern with Career Development I will assist and promote GMercyU’s Career Development services. I will manage social media platforms while producing student success story videos. These videos feature students who have traveled across the world to deliver healthcare to those in need, students who used their spring break to assist disadvantaged individuals in varying cities, and a student who completed an internship with the National Basketball Association. 

I will also contribute through the creation and management of social media accounts, as well as extensive writing pieces. As a Communication major with an interest in video production, photography, and writing, this internship offers limitless opportunities. I look forward to walking away with a well-rounded experience and a greater knowledge of what it takes to pursue my dreams, while educating the GMercyU public on student accomplishments and Career Development resources.

Future Plans

I plan on spending my future behind a camera. I love anything from photojournalism to cinematography.  Video and photo production is something I could do every single day for the rest of my life. It’s always been my dream to contribute to National Geographic or the History Channel.

Check out some of my work


©Timothy J. Weaver Photography 2014



Thursday, September 4, 2014

5 Simple Ideas to Blow the Socks off Your Next Interview

Good article from LinkedIn that discusses interviewing. Number 2 is one that the Career Development staff focus on with students and alumni. 

Two: Prove every strength with a specific example. General statements about strengths like, “I’m a real problem-solver,” or “I’m a strong team player,” are meaningless and quickly forgotten. However, you’ll receive a different reaction entirely when you prove these statements with an actual example of an accomplishment that best demonstrates the strength. Hiring managers remember the accomplishment and, based on the details provided, conclude on their own if the candidate possesses the ability they’re seeking. Come up with an example to prove each of your strengths.

Read the full article at:
www.linkedin.com/pulse/article/20140902155829-15454-5-simple-ideas-to-blow-the-socks-off-your-next-interview

   

Tuesday, August 26, 2014

4 reasons to job shadow a professional

The Career Development Center at Gwynedd Mercy University is once again offering an Externship (Job Shadowing) program for students. Here are the basic details of the program. 
WHAT IS THE EXTERNSHIP PROGRAM?
The program consists of a one day job shadowing experience that allows students to spend time observing a professional for the purpose of investigating a career field. Students are given the opportunity to shadow an alumnus or friend of Gwynedd Mercy University to experience a typical professional work environment in a field of interest.
WHY PARTICIPATE?
The benefits that students receive from participating in this program are invaluable:
1. Help you match your interest and skills with different careers options
2. Develop your confidence when making career related decisions
3. Provide opportunities for networking and possible internships or informational interviews
4. Gain real world experience and see how to apply your education in a professional setting
Here are what students and hosts are saying about the Externship Program:
  • I learned about a typical office atmosphere. I also learned a lot about the types of educational backgrounds and special training it takes to make it in this field.
  • From this externship I learned that there are different jobs within the career field I am interested in and there are several organizations that offer internships in my field.
  • He taught me to not give up on what I am pursuing. I learned that networking plays a very big role in any type of business.
  • The externship that I experienced was very informative and made me realize this is definitely what I want to do. The experience was very helpful.
  • I had a great job shadowing experience. I know the student is looking at internships for next year and, because of a great externship experience, I would be happy to host her for an internship next fall.
For more information in shadowing a professional go to
www.gmercyu.edu/student-life/campus-resources/career-development/externship-program

If you are interested in being a host go to
www.gmercyu.edu/student-life/campus-resources/career-development/externship-program

Thursday, August 7, 2014

Article Snippet: How to Impress When You're the Youngest on the Team

Regardless of the field you are pursuing, as a young graduate it can be tough to shine when you are new to the world of work. Here are 4 quick pointers to help:

Learn the Business
You are new to not only your company but your field so there is still a lot to learn. Dedicate time to researching and exploring your company before you start the job and as part of your regular routine.

Be Unfailingly Reliable
This includes everything from being early, completing projects on time, following up on commitments and presenting yourself professionally in all circumstances.

When Mistakes Happen, Own Them
Mistakes are part of learning and growing and they will happen. When mistakes do happen own them instead of excessively apologizing or attempting to cover them up.

Go the Extra Mile
Complete assigned duties with a positive attitude. Learn to anticipate what will be asked of you so you can come prepared and ready to go. Be willing to venture out of your comfort zone and do things outside of your job description.